heredity

what is heredity?

 

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ heredity

 

Heredity is the passing on of traits from parents to their offspring; either through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction, the offspring cells or organisms acquire the genetic information of their parents. Through heredity, variations between individuals can accumulate and cause species to evolve by natural selection. The study of heredity in biology is genetics.

what are traits?

 

 

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ traits

Identical twins have exactly the same DNA, but they are not exactly alike. Each twin has his or her own personality, talents, likes, and dislikes. There are even diseases that appear in one twin but not the other, including arthritis, diabetes, autism, schizophrenia, cancer, and many others. The differences between identical twins don’t come from DNA—they all come from external factors.

Scientists often study twins to understand how genes and the environment work together to affect traits. They compare traits in identical twins, who have identical DNA, and fraternal twins, who share half their DNA, just like any siblings. If a characteristic appears more frequently in identical twin pairs than in fraternal twin pairs, then it has an inherited component.

 

color eyes

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ color eye

 

 

Eye color is a polygenic phenotypic character determined by two distinct factors: the pigmentation of the eye‘s iris[1][2] and the frequency-dependence of the scattering of light by the turbid medium in the stroma of the iris.[3]:9

In humans, the pigmentation of the iris varies from light brown to black, depending on the concentration of melanin in the iris pigment epithelium (located on the back of the iris), the melanin content within the iris stroma (located at the front of the iris), and the cellular density of the stroma.[4] The appearance of blue and green, as well as hazel eyes, results from the Tyndall scattering of light in the stroma, a phenomenon similar to that which accounts for the blueness of the sky called Rayleigh scattering.[5] Neither blue nor green pigments are ever present in the human iris or ocular fluid.[3][6] Eye color is thus an instance of structural color and varies depending on the lighting conditions, especially for lighter-colored eyes.

The brightly colored eyes of many bird species result from the presence of other pigments, such as pteridinespurines, and carotenoids.[7] Humans and other animals have many phenotypic variations in eye color.[8] The genetics of eye color are complicated, and color is determined by multiple genes. So far, as many as 15 genes have been associated with eye color inheritance. Some of the eye-color genes include OCA2 and HERC2.[9] The earlier belief that blue eye color is a simple recessive trait has been shown to be incorrect. The genetics of eye color are so complex that almost any parent-child combination of eye colors can occur.[10][11] However, OCA2 gene polymorphism, close to proximal 5′ regulatory region, explains most human eye-color variation.[12]

 

color hair

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ color hair

 

Hair color is the pigmentation of hair follicles due to two types of melanineumelanin and pheomelanin. Generally, if more eumelanin is present, the color of the hair is darker; if less eumelanin is present, the hair is lighter. Levels of melanin can vary over time causing a person’s hair color to change, and it is possible to have hair follicles of more than one color on the same person. Particular hair colors are often associated with ethnic groups, while gray or white hair is associated with age.

 

skin color

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ skin color

 

Human skin color ranges in variety from the darkest brown to the lightest hues. An individual’s skin pigmentation is the result of genetics, being the product of both of the individual’s biological parents‘ genetic makeup, and exposure to sun. In evolution, skin pigmentation in human beings evolved by a process of natural selection primarily to regulate the amount of ultraviolet radiation penetrating the skin, controlling its biochemical effects.[1]

The actual skin color of different humans is affected by many substances, although the single most important substance is the pigment melanin. Melanin is produced within the skin in cells called melanocytes and it is the main determinant of the skin color of darker-skinned humans. The skin color of people with light skin is determined mainly by the bluish-white connective tissue under the dermis and by the hemoglobin circulating in the veins of the dermis. The red color underlying the skin becomes more visible, especially in the face, when, as consequence of physical exercise or the stimulation of the nervous system (anger, fear), arterioles dilate.[2] Color is not entirely uniform across an individual’s skin; for example, the skin of the palm and the sole is lighter than most other skin, and this is especially noticeable in darker-skinned pe

There is a direct correlation between the geographic distribution of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and the distribution of indigenous skin pigmentation around the world. Areas that receive higher amounts of UVR, generally located closer to the equator, tend to have darker-skinned populations. Areas that are far from the tropics and closer to the poles have lower intensity of UVR, which is reflected in lighter-skinned populations.[4] Researchers suggest that human populations over the past 50,000 years have changed from dark-skinned to light-skinned and vice versa as they migrated to different UV zones,[5] and that such major changes in pigmentation may have happened in as little as 100 generations (≈2,500 years) through selective sweeps.[5][6][7] Natural skin color can also darken as a result of tanning due to exposure to sunlight. The leading theory is that skin color adapts to intense sunlight irradiation to provide partial protection against the ultraviolet fraction that produces damage and thus mutations in the DNA of the skin cells.[8][9] In addition, it has been observed that adult human females on average are significantly lighter in skin pigmentation than males. Females need more calcium during pregnancy and lactation. The body synthesizes vitamin D from sunlight, which helps it absorb calcium. Females evolved to have lighter skin so their bodies absorb more calcium.[10]

The social significance of differences in skin color has varied across cultures and over time, as demonstrated with regard to social status and discrimination.

 

Hairline

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ Hairline

 

 

Hairline lowering surgery is also recommended to many patients undergoing facial feminization surgery (FFS). The shape of the hairline is altered, creating a low, feminine hairline. For MTF (male to female) patients who have very prominent brow bones, brow bone shaving may be performed additionaly.

 

dimpledimple (also known as a gelasin)[1] is a small natural indentation in the flesh on a part of the human body, most notably in the cheek or on the chin.

ผลการค้นหารูปภาพสำหรับ dimple

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