History Of Caveman

Caveman-like heraldic “wild men” were found in European and African iconography for hundreds of years. During the Middle Ages, these creatures were generally depicted in art and literature as bearded and covered in hair, and often wielding clubs and dwelling in caves. While wild men were always depicted as living outside of civilization, there was an ongoing debate as to whether they were human or animal.

In Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Lost World (1912), ape-men are depicted in a fight with modern humans. Edgar Rice Burroughs adapted this idea for The Land That Time Forgot (1918). A genre of caveman movies emerged, typified by D. W. Griffith‘s Man’s Genesis (1912); they inspired Charles Chaplin‘s satiric take,[2] in His Prehistoric Past (1914) as well as Brute Force (1914), The Cave Man (1912), and later Cave Man (1934). From the descriptions, Griffith’s characters cannot talk, and use sticks and stones for weapons, while the hero of Cave Man is a Tarzanesque figure who fights dinosaurs.

D. W. Griffith‘s Brute Force, a silent film released in 1914, represents one of the earliest portrayals of cavemen and dinosaurs together; more recent examples include the comic strip B.C. and the television series The Flintstones.

The anachronistic combination of cavemen with dinosaurs itself became a humorous stereotype. The comic strips B.C., Alley Oop, the Spanish comic franchise Mortadelo y Filemón, and occasionally The Far Side and Gogs portray “cavemen” with dinosaurs. Gary Larson, in his The Prehistory of the Far Side, stated he once felt that he needed to confess his cartooning sins in this regard: “O Father, I Have Portrayed Primitive Man and Dinosaurs In The Same Cartoon”.[3] The animated series The Flintstones, a spoof on family sitcoms, portrays the Flintstones even using dinosaurs and prehistoric mammals as tools, household appliances, vehicles, and construction machines.[4]

Stereotypical cavemen are also often featured in advertising, including advertisements for Minute Maid.[year needed] In early 2004, GEICO launched a series of television commercials and attempts at viral marketing, collectively known as the GEICO Cavemen advertising campaign, where GEICO announcers are repeatedly denounced by modern cavemen for perpetuating a stereotype of unintelligent, backward cavemen. The GEICO advertisements spawned a short-lived TV series called Cavemen.

แหล่งอ้างอิงhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caveman

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